Sharing Wellness – Free to attend, Bingham, Notts, UK

sharing-wellness-nottingham-2017

SHARE Wellness

I have been working with lots of people for a long time now to figure out what helps people recovery from all sorts of troubles and to have sustained wellness. We are now keen to start sharing what we’ve learned.

We’ve found that Wellness means different things to different people and some people do not even like the word wellness at all! One quick definition that works for me is, Wellness is about; BEING WELL, DOING WELL and BEING ABLE TO ADAPT TO STAY WELL. Later, I am keen to share how others are seeing/considering wellness.

A tricky thing with a new website/blog is knowing what to start with… maybe I just start with the idea that each page/post needs to be entertaining and educational. Also, knowing that WordPress allows for unlimited changes and improvements, so pages and posts may not be perfect but can be improved in response to your comments.

From: SHAREWellnessBlog.com

Intermittent Fasting to Improve Mood – Not just bipolar

Many psychiatric drugs have a side-effect of increased appetite.

As soon as I agreed to take Olanzapine I found I was getting hungry far more frequently while having less and less interest in exercising. On a combination of lithium and Olanzapine I steadied out at around 45 pounds heavier than my usual weight. I am sure I got off lightly as I know many people who about doubled their weight while taking Olanzapine.

I have said/blogged about how my weight came down as I reduced my lithium intake. Now, I believe the bigger factor was my being able to gradually reduce my intake of Olanzapine and eventually coming off all psychiatric drugs. My weight is now about what it was before starting on these drugs.

What has been bothering me for a while is that bad eating habits that set in while I was on Olanzapine keep coming back. Perhaps those habits have never left me.

I have read and watched lots and lots about the importance of fasting, or at least having several hours between meals and not eating when we should be sleeping. My scientific background allows me to feel I understand why eating less often is so beneficial, yet knowing stuff does not necessary make changing habits any easier.

After another stressful period I recently realized that I was again eating from early morning until late evening with perhaps a total of 12 meals/snacks! Not on any psychiatric drugs I’ve not been putting on weight but am sure all this eating has been doing me harm.

Since 1st January (yes, sounds like a New Year resolution) I have started to take overnight fasting seriously. A friend has reminded me of an info-graphic from Dr Mercola. See below.

My current plans are nowhere near so ambitious at this time. I am currently seeing getting past 9am without eating and not eating after about 7pm as great achievements and I am just starting to get benefits from this in terms of having more energy through eating less. Yes, sounds a bit bizarre, but by eating less often I mostly have more energy and feel better too.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is not a form of starvation but a way for you to time your meals to maximize your body’s ability to burn fat. Embed this info-graphic on your site to serve as a guide for you to create a healthy eating plan, and reap the many benefits of fasting done the right way. Use the embed code to share it on your website or visit our infographic page for the high-res version… Intermittent fasting

Sharing Wellness – Pay It Forward

About 5 years without needing medication and 17 years since hospitalization, I am spending a lot less time on bipolar and a lot more time with family and working on new business ventures.

I am keen to ‘give back’ locally – kind of ‘pay it forward’… If you live near Nottingham in the UK you will be very welcome to join us at any of these events. The first is this Monday 19th Sept 2016.

SHARE Wellness

Printable pdf of this invitation: sharing-wellness-in-a-well-bingham-invitation

Regarding side-effects of psychiatric drugs

Dear reader,

I am glad you found my answer to your question of, “When taking Carbamazepine I have heard it said to only have bottled water to avoid chlorine that that may interacts with Carbamazepine – is this true and important?” As you say, it is worth sharing these thoughts on Carbamazepine and other psychiatric drugs, as others may also find this discussion useful so I will post what I was saying here:

Answer:

It is worth looking at the side-effects of carbamazepine in the link below. I have heard hundreds of stories of weird interactions like the one about chlorine and carba… These may or may not have some truth in them but 99% of the time such ideas are trivial. The drugs are toxic so, in the very long-term, the more we take the sicker we get.

How to help your mum?… The food she is having is likely to be cheap rather than good, so maybe check on what supplements she is having to make up for some of the deficiencies. E.g. Any sort of omega-3 supplement? Omega-3 being good for the heart, brain and joints.

Drugs

All drugs have lots of side-effects. A simple way of looking at psychiatric drugs is that they are;

  • intended to make us less anxious and therefor have to…
  • cause us to have less energy
  • this requires them to be toxic
  • and so they cause just a little damage with every dose

It is the less energy bit that explains how they work. If you think of a mood map, then less energy takes us down and out of the anxious quadrant and into the ‘low’ quadrant. The drugs work when the dose is low enough to take the edge off the anxiety such that we can;

  • better explain our troubles to a good listener
  • listen to good advice from people who have been through similar troubles

The trouble with this approach include;

  • The dose is usually too strong (Dr Moncrief writes about this)
  • Drugs are used for too long (All were originally intended for short term use by the scientists who created them – but the marketing people know there is more money to be made when patients fail to recover)
  • Addiction gets worse with time as our bodies adapt to expect to have to cope with toxins everyday
  • Damage is cumulative

These troubles are all obvious, but the other two troubles that make the drug route pretty useless are;

  • We struggle to find good listeners
  • The health service puts us in front of people who have not been through what we are going through and so their advice is rarely much use

So, when you read the side-effects of carbamazepine… really, pretty similar to most psychiatric drugs. These drugs are never going to be part of a cure unless short-term and matched up with talking (listening/talking) therapies.

http://www.drugs.com/sfx/carbamazepine-side-effects.html

I have to add that it is almost always dangerous to come off any drug quickly. Change has to start with better lifestyle and that usually needs to include better nutrition.

 

After Bipolar – Repairing Your Liver – John Bergman Video

Repairing Your Liver

I love Dr John Bergman’s videos. I have not seen a bad one yet. This one has inspired me to write again on Rethinking Bipolar after a few months away.

John is saying things that I have been sharing with clients. He says it so much better, so much more clearly, in a more entertaining way and has some great slides too.

If you ever had bipolar and took any of those psychiatric drugs that tend to go with bipolar then you are going to want to be repairing your liver as part of getting back to being as fit as you can be.

The doctor explains what you need to do, so where might I come in? I can help you to grasp the root causes of your troubles and support you in quickly eliminating or reducing the most damaging of these causes, allowing you to have better physical and emotional well-being.

Rethinking Health consultations are £50/hour – not cheap at all, so please only contact me if you are serious about getting better.

It is great video – how about setting 30 minutes aside to watch it with friends:

And yes, there is life after bipolar – you mainly need to meet up with people who know this to be true.

Roger

The Daily Philosophy of an Ex-Mental Patient – Laura Delano

Although taking time off from all things bipolar to support Becky and her new baby, when a good friend sent me a link to this article I decide it well worth sharing even more widely: the-daily-philosophy-of-an-ex-mental-patient

Here is an excerpt: “Challenge the stories you’re telling yourself about how worthless, broken, and unacceptable you are—those are stories taught to you by forces profiting off of keeping you dis-empowered, silent, passive, and dependent.

Let me know if you are finding such ideas useful.

Glutinous Bipolar – Gluten and Bipolar Symptoms

Glutinous Bipolar – Gluten and Bipolar Symptoms

It is 16 years since I was last detained on a psychiatric ward, 15 years since I learned how to self-manage and stay away from psychiatrists. It is now more than 4 years since I last took any psychiatric drug.

Today, it feels like I am ‘back to square one’ with words from a 1960’s song in my head.

Lock me away and don’t allow the day, here inside, where I hide with my loneliness…

Everything was going well, so why am I feeling this way?

It was cold and dark with a bitter wind. I was walking back to the train station when I got some bad news on my phone just as a welcoming fish ‘n’ chip shop came into view. I had promised a friend I would not eat chips. I went in and bought a sausage instead.

Somehow I convinced myself that any gluten in the sausage would not matter. This was not good food for me, but it was hot and seemed to be what I needed to deal with the cold and bad news. Was this self-harm? Were things going too well? Could it be my “inner saboteur” getting the better of me?

After more than a month with no gluten at all, with minimal pain, great positivity and plenty of sustained energy, just an hour after eating the gluten… my world was starting to fall apart.

Three days of misery followed with stupid coffee drinking and loads of dairy produce. Three days of binging, increasing gut pains and foggy and confused thinking.

Was it always gluten? It is 19 years since I was prescribed medications to calm my guts, but it was one of these that made my insomnia worse and led to the psychiatric drugs. These sedated me and in many ways made my life easier, but all the time they were allowing more gut damage to occur.

Each new doctor said it was all in my head and nothing to do with my gut, so I had to figure it out for myself. Now it seems I can only survive and thrive if I can learn from my mistakes and so avoid gluten regardless of what life throws at me.

Food and Mood / Natural Nutrition courses and support from Rethinking Health