Does eating butter make you happier? #LCHF #16:8

It is known that eating butter helps with weight loss and with reversing many chronic illnesses. I do not know if butter makes us all healthier overall. Personally, I feel good having slices of butter almost every day.

If you do not have much time just watch from from 10m 30s, then maybe skip to the less scientific video below this one. (Maybe also weight loss example from 16m 30s.)

Butter Makes Your Pants Fall Off

Why am I not blogging about bipolar? 

I am keen to share how I stay well rather than how ill I was.

So, I have been on a LCHF diet or as some people say “High Fat / Low Carb” for a few years. Okay, so I am a bit thin, but it feels better being thin than how fat I was while on prescription drugs and on low fat. So, no prescription drugs for about 5 years now. Latest dietary change for me is to 16:8 = 16 hours fasting and 8 hour eating window each day. I am still working on this – getting it right most days.

I am finding that with LCHF and 16:8, together with mainly plant-based (non-factory foods) is giving me the energy for lots of 3D Dynamic Movement.

Ed Sheeran | Embrace Your Weirdness #notjustbipolar #sheeran #stuttering

Embrace Your Weirdness. This is what Ed Sheeran suggests we do. He also says, “Get the treatment you need.” Now, that is not especially about moods, but think about it… If you are not recovering or getting unwell, then the treatment you need may not be what you are being offered at this time.

This is a fuller version that includes some swear words. Below is the shorter version without swear words.

It is okay to be different. The shorter version…

Who is Ed Sheeran? An amazing person – Almost 400 million views – Wow!

 

Fat for Fuel – Dr Mercola – #Mercola

Fat for Fuel is a New Book by Dr Mercola

I’ve not read it. I am not selling it. It is however, the way I have gradually been moving for sometime now. It is not only good for physical health but in the longer term is great for steadying moods. If you want to eliminate bipolar disorder then using fat for fuel is almost certainly going to help.

Mammals, and therefore all of us, work well while using fat as our main energy source. This is known as ketosis which is a word that to many people can sound bad. It is not bad, it is just what our bodies do automatically whenever we go without eating for 6 hours or so. (The exact number of hours varies from person to person.)

Question 1 of 2: In a typical 24 hours what is the longest you go without consuming any food or drink that contains carbohydrates or man-made chemicals?

I have found the easiest way to maximizing my time in fat-burning mode is not to eat or drink any carbohydrates in the morning. For me, this includes avoiding drinks with any kind of added milk, because milk contains sugar.

Whether I say I am skipping breakfast on days I do not eat before noon, or I say that I am having a very late ‘break-fast-meal’, it is the days I do this when I feel best and think most clearly.

Question 2 of 2: After reading about Fat for Fuel could you share, using the comments option, how going longer between meals and minimizing snacking helps you to be in the mood you want to be in?

A new website set up by Dr Mercola: www.fatforfuel.org

Just to make it clear… I am not being paid to advertise this… I simply believe most people would be healthier and less prone to mood disorders if eating less often and this requires us to burn fat for fuel.

Three dimensional movement – #notjustbipolar – including a great video from Lisa Huck

What is 3D movement all about?

Whether or not we believe we have a mood disorder, depression, bipolar or any kind of disorder, the way our lives ‘pan out’ will depend so much on how we choose to look after our bodies. In some ways, ‘When we look after our body, then our; brain, mind, emotions, feelings and so on can all heal and we can make great progress with what we most want to be doing.’

I found the 15 minute video below on Dr Mercola’s site this morning and I am sharing this freely and as widely as possible.

In the video, Lisa Huck delivers amazing/useful information with a great combination of audio and visual.

If you are sitting, I suggest you stand, if you can, and move as you watch and listen to Lisa Huck of ThriveFNL.

Lisa explains things about our bones and muscles that I believe need to be taught in every school. It matches so well how I have been thinking just that I do not have the training and skills demonstrated by Lisa Huck… Fifteen minutes of brilliance:

Brain Health – Maximizing Memory – Roger Smith

Maximizing Memory (Part 1 – Focus on Food and Drink)

Thursday 23rd February 2017

Folks and Fables, Bingham

2:30pm to 3:30pm    and    6:30pm to 7:30pm

This is my next talk, followed by discussion, sharing much of the new research into:

  • Improving our memory
  • Growing new brain cells

Find out more from Folks and Fables

Fasting to improve mood

I wrote about fasting to improve mood a month ago. I have made progress and am keen to share this.

Due to my blood sugar being a bit high (not diabetic but often higher than I want it to be) I have created a more ambitious plan for eating better quality food while overall eating less.

For 7 days now I have not eaten before noon. That is, no breakfast at all and no drinks that could be considered as food. This is a big change, for me, especially as I was brought up believing breakfast was essential. I also bought into the idea of “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day” before I discovered this meme was invented by businesses that sell breakfast cereals!

I made this transition by initially eating until late in the evening. Gradually I am finishing all eating a little earlier each evening to create a genuine fast, with my first meal feeling like ‘breaking a fast’ rather than a meal called break-fast.

This is day 8. It is 12:45pm and so far not eaten today.

Before I say how I am feeling on this new regime, I want to make it clear that I am not starving myself at all. I am eating a little less but only because I find I am less hungry and more satisfied with the better quality, mainly organic, foods I am choosing.

Moods? Essentially, I am feeling mostly good. I have a little more energy, doing 10,000 steps per day, sleeping through the night and yesterday easily swam 100 lengths… okay, it was a small pool!

If you do not see an update from me within a month, please feel free to ask how my longer overnight fasting is going and how this is improving my health.

Here is my previous article on fasting to improve mood

Sharing Wellness – Free to attend, Bingham, Notts, UK

sharing-wellness-nottingham-2017

SHARE Wellness

I have been working with lots of people for a long time now to figure out what helps people recovery from all sorts of troubles and to have sustained wellness. We are now keen to start sharing what we’ve learned.

We’ve found that Wellness means different things to different people and some people do not even like the word wellness at all! One quick definition that works for me is, Wellness is about; BEING WELL, DOING WELL and BEING ABLE TO ADAPT TO STAY WELL. Later, I am keen to share how others are seeing/considering wellness.

A tricky thing with a new website/blog is knowing what to start with… maybe I just start with the idea that each page/post needs to be entertaining and educational. Also, knowing that WordPress allows for unlimited changes and improvements, so pages and posts may not be perfect but can be improved in response to your comments.

From: SHAREWellnessBlog.com

Intermittent Fasting to Improve Mood – Not just bipolar

Many psychiatric drugs have a side-effect of increased appetite.

As soon as I agreed to take Olanzapine I found I was getting hungry far more frequently while having less and less interest in exercising. On a combination of lithium and Olanzapine I steadied out at around 45 pounds heavier than my usual weight. I am sure I got off lightly as I know many people who about doubled their weight while taking Olanzapine.

I have said/blogged about how my weight came down as I reduced my lithium intake. Now, I believe the bigger factor was my being able to gradually reduce my intake of Olanzapine and eventually coming off all psychiatric drugs. My weight is now about what it was before starting on these drugs.

What has been bothering me for a while is that bad eating habits that set in while I was on Olanzapine keep coming back. Perhaps those habits have never left me.

I have read and watched lots and lots about the importance of fasting, or at least having several hours between meals and not eating when we should be sleeping. My scientific background allows me to feel I understand why eating less often is so beneficial, yet knowing stuff does not necessary make changing habits any easier.

After another stressful period I recently realized that I was again eating from early morning until late evening with perhaps a total of 12 meals/snacks! Not on any psychiatric drugs I’ve not been putting on weight but am sure all this eating has been doing me harm.

Since 1st January (yes, sounds like a New Year resolution) I have started to take overnight fasting seriously. A friend has reminded me of an info-graphic from Dr Mercola. See below.

My current plans are nowhere near so ambitious at this time. I am currently seeing getting past 9am without eating and not eating after about 7pm as great achievements and I am just starting to get benefits from this in terms of having more energy through eating less. Yes, sounds a bit bizarre, but by eating less often I mostly have more energy and feel better too.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is not a form of starvation but a way for you to time your meals to maximize your body’s ability to burn fat. Embed this info-graphic on your site to serve as a guide for you to create a healthy eating plan, and reap the many benefits of fasting done the right way. Use the embed code to share it on your website or visit our infographic page for the high-res version… Intermittent fasting

Replacing refined carbohydrates with healthy fats to have better control of our own moods

Food and Mood: I’ve been teaching about links between excess sugar and mood troubles for years. Now with a lot of renewed interest in this subject I am going to invite readers to comment on these two big generalizations:

  1. Eating refined carbohydrates leads to higher and more variable levels of sugar in the blood, and this leads to all kinds of chronic health troubles as well as less control over our moods.
  2. Eating appropriate amounts (and a good range) of healthy fats helps to keep sugar in the blood at healthy levels making all kinds of chronic health troubles less likely while allowing us to develop better control over our moods.

Remembering that, for good health and longevity, at no time do we want more than about one teaspoon of sugar (glucose that is) circulating in our blood stream, we know that foods that spike our blood sugar cannot be good for us. We do need to eat something though, as simply cutting out carbs tends to make us miserable.

For my friend in South Wales, who is resolving to drastically cut back on sugar consumption from 1st January (influenced in part by the article below) – I recommend finding out about healthy fats… What is a healthy fat? How do we get a wide range of different healthy fats?

The long article below explains a lot about how fat was vilified while the dangers of sugar mostly ignored. How much of this false information came from the work of Ancel Keys who seems to have falsified evidence to show fat and cholesterol were problematic while being paid for this by the sugar industry?https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/07/the-sugar-conspiracy-robert-lustig-john-yudkin?

Not just bipolar – Testing the Link Between Aluminum and Alzheimer’s #Alzheimers

I heard that aluminium may cause brain troubles many years ago. It may have a little to do with bipolar as it has mainly been linked with Alzheimer’s.

A few weeks back I heard that drinking silicon-rich mineral water might help to flush excess aluminium from our brains.

If you watch this two minute video I think you will agree the possibilities are amazing:
Please let me know if you’d like to hear more about amazing possibilities for recovery.

Not just bipolar – staying healthy by avoiding ‘ultra-processed foods’ #ADHD

Ultra-processed foods – I am thinking “ultra-processed” may be a useful term, as avoiding all processed foods is too difficult for most people.

e.g. Boiling organic potatoes at home and mashing these with organic butter is food processing…. But compared with… say, making the same potatoes into crisps with about 6 ingredients and cooking such as the water content gets so low the crisps can be stored for a year is surely a lot more processing

This morning I am thinking that, “As most people want to eat processed foods, health may be improved quite a bit just by avoiding the most processed (ultra-processed) foods and going for some really simple processing… e.g. oats cooked in a saucepan with only water and natural rock salt added. This would seem to be fairly low processing.

Article on ultra-processed foods: https://thehealthsciencesacademy.org/science-catch-up/science-catch-up-25/#topic5

((( based on this – after a quick look at where this information came from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27733404 I am thinking that any result other than the people who eat the most biscuits getting fattest would have been odd! )))

I am adding #ADHD to the title above because one of the best things to do for reducing ADHD and bipolar symptoms is to avoid foods with a lot of added chemicals.

Another reason why eating green leafy vegetables helps us to be healthier and happier #CoQ10

I have shared this 6 minute video before. I want to share it again because the second half is amazing.

As Dr Gregor says, “It blew my mind.”

It really is amazing. The main message is scientists have recently discovered a way in which eating green leaves and then going out in the sunshine is incredibly good for us.

Why have so few people watched this? I suggest you skip the first part about faeces in slaughter houses and start watching/listening from 2 minutes 0 seconds.

Sharing Wellness – Pay It Forward

About 5 years without needing medication and 17 years since hospitalization, I am spending a lot less time on bipolar and a lot more time with family and working on new business ventures.

I am keen to ‘give back’ locally – kind of ‘pay it forward’… If you live near Nottingham in the UK you will be very welcome to join us at any of these events. The first is this Monday 19th Sept 2016.

SHARE Wellness

Printable pdf of this invitation: sharing-wellness-in-a-well-bingham-invitation

An Optimum Diet for Mood Stability and Long-Term Good Health #notjustbipolar

Real Food: The Best Diet – Andrew Weil, M.D. explains what to eat and drink more and less of:

(This talk is largely about USA diet. USA has the highest incidence of bipolar and many other modern disorders. Elsewhere in the world we need to learn from America’s mistakes.)

 

Can there really be an optimum diet?

It perhaps depends on what we mean by optimum (or maybe it is optimal?). If optimum diet means the best diet we can work out for ourselves, and a diet we can stick with, to keep us healthy then, yes, it just takes a while to figure out what is good for us.

Why did I start searching for my optimum diet?

Stress caused indigestion, such that I could not sleep and this led to a psychiatric admission where I was heavily sedated, and started to rapidly gain weight. I reacted badly to some of the newer sedative drugs and was diagnosed as bipolar. Eventually coming off the drugs I then had gut pains almost every night. I had to work out what was causing these pains. It took me years to find most of what works and does not work for me. Even with my current optimum diet my quest continues as there is always room for improvement.

It is all about balance

What has worked for me is finding out more about our daily needs for moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and fibre.  That makes five ‘macro-nutrients’ to be balanced. There are plenty of micro-nutrients#1 to be considered too, just that I have found that getting the five macro-nutrients in about the right proportions at each meal time to be life changing.

Modern myths were the biggest challenge to overcome

  • I was once told, “eating fat makes us fat”. It sounded so believable. It is so untrue. What I was eating that was putting weight on was a lot of carbohydrate, and the same was true for every person I knew who was getting fatter. We were all addicted to carbs and we were cutting back on fat. It wasn’t working.
  • I came to believe that “eating lots of protein is a good way to get slimmer”. This is half-true. Protein is more slowly digested than carbohydrate and usually makes us feel fuller for longer. Changing to a high protein/low carb diet is slimming. However, it is rarely a good long-term plan, as high protein diets are often not high enough in fat. On high protein I lost 40 pounds in weight but gradually felt weaker and was not sleeping well. See point 7 that I have just added below – 25th August 2016.
  • I was told that “fibre does not provide any energy and so is slimming”. Yes, fibre can help with slimming, however gut bacteria can partially digest some fibre for us, giving us extra energy. This turns out to be a good thing for moods as this energy is released gradually and helps our guts to work better.
  • I believed, “fruit is slimming”. If you look around (in UK) you may well notice that most over-weight people are eating lots of fruit and very little of green vegetables. Fruit is high in the fruit sugar, fructose. Unlike glucose (the main ‘vegetable sugar’), fructose is not used as energy by the muscles but can be readily turned into body fat by the liver. Fruit may be good, just rarely as good as salad and vegetables.

Balance

When we get past the myths we come back to looking for balance. Here is some good information#2 that works for me:

1)      Proper meals need to have a good percentage of both protein and fat as once digested these can travel through the blood together as lipoproteins, to allow the right fats to be delivered to the right parts of the body and brain to allow repairs. This seems to help a lot with steadying mood.

2)      Most of us are not getting enough good quality fat and are often short of fats known as omega-3 and MCFAs.

3)      It is close to impossible to have fried foods not containing damaged fats, so my current optimum diet is one with no fried foods.

4)      The brain needs glucose, so although we can live with almost no carbohydrates, this is likely to lead to misery. I can get enough glucose by digesting vegetables without needing to eat grain/cereal every day.

5)      There are many types of fibre, so eating a range of vegetables and just a little fruit every day helps with steadier digestion, which in turns helps us to have more of the moods we want to be having.

6)      There can be no set amount of water to go with our diet. Learning to be guided by thirst and drinking as soon as I start to get thirsty works for me. Carrying a bottle of water on all but the most local journeys makes a lot of sense.

7)      It is 2 years since I published this article (16th July 2014) and reading it through today (25th August 2016) the only thing I want to add is: It is so easy to eat too much protein. If you have always eaten meat and fish it takes a while to get used to eating a little less protein. I believe it does help for long-term health and mood stability. For me, a diet with only about 15% protein and close to 50% healthy fats (including; avocado, nuts, seeds, olives and butter) seems to be helping my liver and kidneys to heal after all those years on prescription drugs and lithium.  

From disorder to order

Eliminating the disorder part of bipolar is likely to require dietary changes. For me the most outstanding results have come from increasing#3 my variety of fat sources and ensuring every meal has a good content of healthy fats. It was the extra fats working with the protein in each meal that allowed my brain and body to heal and allows me to go longer between meals. Balanced meals help us to avoid slumps in energy and periods of despondency.  This approach continues to work for me.

Links:

#1 I will be writing more about micro-nutrients and how these link to common modern disorders.

#2 I have written about or am writing about these aspect of balancing diet and mood. Contact me if you would like to learn more now.

#3 Overall I am only eating a bit more fat as I cut out fried foods. Eating more fat and being more active go together. If we eat more fat then we are going to need to walk more. When I do eat more fat I find it easier to be doing more exercise while being less tired. I will write more about this later.

Roger Smith – www.rethinkingbipolar.com – article 14th July 2014