Nutrition – Healthy Dietary Fat

I thought I’d share the mind-map-planning I did for my ‘good, bad and ugly’ dietary fats training. If you have a training venue and people who want to know more about nutrition for wellness, recovery, health, happiness and longevity, then  do contact me. Best wishes Roger.

Fats for Cafe 2017-07-17 Folks and Fables - Roger Smith - SHARE Wellness

Sharing Wellness – Nutrition Presentations, Bingham, Notts, UK

This Mind Map is from my preparations for Monday’s presentation and discussions at Folks and Fables cafe. If you’d like a copy of the other slides that go with this in pdf format just ask.

Sharing-Wellness-Roger-Smith-Sugar-Mind-Map-Updated-2017-June-26-Slide-01

If you are local and would like to attend or in UK and would like me to share similar at another venue: www.stoppaddling.com/bingham

If diagnosed as bipolar, how much might lowering unhealthy carbs while increasing healthy fats help? #LCHF #notjustbipolar

Does HCLF cause mood troubles? Does HFLC help to eliminate mood troubles?

A bit of a generalization here:

  • Countries that have been early adopters the Standard American Diet (often called the SAD diet) have far higher rates of mood disorder, including bipolar.
  • Countries that seem to have resisted the Standard American Diet or have been slow to adopt it have far lower rates of mood disorder, including bipolar.

This does not prove anything as there are probably hundreds of other factors. It is probably just as true that countries that have more televisions per capita have higher rates of depression. This does not show TV causes depression but may, at most, suggest some weak link between affluence and more mood troubles.

Healthy brains are made mainly from healthy fat and healthy cholesterol. In whatever way we might choose to deprive ourselves of healthy fat and healthy cholesterol we will run into brain health troubles. Choosing not to eat cholesterol does not seem to be a problem. If eating good food a healthy human liver will make healthy cholesterol as needed. (Recent research indicates that almost any cell in the body can also make healthy-cholesterol if it is a well-nourished cell.) Depriving ourselves of essential fats (and I believe, going very low on some of the non-essential fats) will lead to brain deterioration and mood troubles.

Energy: The bulk of the energy in our food and drink always has to come from either fat or carbs. (It has become clearer-and-clearer that getting more than about 20% of our energy from protein damages the liver, kidneys, may even increase the likelihood of diabetes) We need to think, ‘fat or carbs?’ This is a decision I believe most people need to make.

The S.A. Diet has for a few decades been high in unhealthy fats and exceptionally high in unhealthy carbs. This is a lethal combination for both the body and the brain.

I have been teaching about diet for a long time and used to warn people against all sorts of things that I now tend to suggest people investigate eating more of, such as saturated fat (although I stress the importance of this being from organic farming). Examples include butter if you like the taste of it or coconut oil for the strict vegans. Moderation is still important, as you have to stick within what your digestive system, liver and blood vessels can handle in any one hit.

What have I seen in people around me? Those consuming higher levels healthy fats and very little of the least healthy (highly processed) carbs are both physically and mentally fitter and are better at the sort of thing Tom Wootton talks about, which is to be able to function well almost regardless of emotional upsets.

And me, personally? It has been a long road, in which I have used many tools and done a lot of experimenting on myself. I am convinced that consuming quite a lot of healthy fat every day has been doing me good. It is, for me, just one of hundreds of dietary and other changes I needed to make. What does not work for me is when I add refined carbs on top of my high-ish-fat plant-based meals.

Example: So far today…

  • The only food I had before driving to a meeting in Nottingham was 20g of 100% chocolate (less than 1% sugar and very high in saturated fat)
  • I next ate between 2pm and 3pm when I had a large ripe avocado, olives, walnuts and loads of vegetables, finished off with another 20g of that same chocolate.
  • Currently, I wait to see how I feel before my next meal and if I feel I need it I’ll include fatty fish or two ORGANIC eggs. If I don’t feel in need of food from animals I don’t have those. It is better for me not to always eat the way I was brought-up and almost certainly better for the planet if I only eat what I need. I’m not eating much meat at all these days, partly because it is not that easy to get organic meat around here and partly because I just don’t seem to need it like I used to.
  • Last night I had some organic beans late in the evening and slept soundly – I may do the same this evening. I am currently considering organic beans as a source of healthy carbs, although I know purists on HFLC might avoid beans.

[I like chocolate – I don’t eat chocolate everyday, else, for me, it can become an addiction!]

How important is it to get onto HFLC or at least make a decision about how to eliminate the most unhealthy of the carbs? I think an even more important meme to keep in our heads, whether or not we have been said to be bipolar, is,

The most important decision we make each day is what we put in our mouths.

The more I think about this the surer I become that it is so true.

As a last thought on this subject for now: I find that each day… what I eat that day;

    • influences my moods,
    • has a huge impact on how I well I can function,
    • has the biggest impact on my energy levels
    • and usually can provide good and steadier energy levels allowing me to achieve a great deal
    • and be something like the person I want to be…

…the next day.

—————————————————–

As I often do, I am going to finish by saying that just because medical people said I had a mood disorder and I no longer take any prescription medications that does not mean it is easy to stop taking these. Getting the right food undoubtedly helps, just be aware there are so many other lifestyle changes that may also be needed before any changes of prescription medications. Make sure you have the best doctors you can find and talk with them.

Does eating butter make you happier? #LCHF #16:8

It is known that eating butter helps with weight loss and with reversing many chronic illnesses. I do not know if butter makes us all healthier overall. Personally, I feel good having slices of butter almost every day.

If you do not have much time just watch from from 10m 30s, then maybe skip to the less scientific video below this one. (Maybe also weight loss example from 16m 30s.)

Butter Makes Your Pants Fall Off

Why am I not blogging about bipolar? 

I am keen to share how I stay well rather than how ill I was.

So, I have been on a LCHF diet or as some people say “High Fat / Low Carb” for a few years. Okay, so I am a bit thin, but it feels better being thin than how fat I was while on prescription drugs and on low fat. So, no prescription drugs for about 5 years now. Latest dietary change for me is to 16:8 = 16 hours fasting and 8 hour eating window each day. I am still working on this – getting it right most days.

I am finding that with LCHF and 16:8, together with mainly plant-based (non-factory foods) is giving me the energy for lots of 3D Dynamic Movement.

Replacing refined carbohydrates with healthy fats to have better control of our own moods

Food and Mood: I’ve been teaching about links between excess sugar and mood troubles for years. Now with a lot of renewed interest in this subject I am going to invite readers to comment on these two big generalizations:

  1. Eating refined carbohydrates leads to higher and more variable levels of sugar in the blood, and this leads to all kinds of chronic health troubles as well as less control over our moods.
  2. Eating appropriate amounts (and a good range) of healthy fats helps to keep sugar in the blood at healthy levels making all kinds of chronic health troubles less likely while allowing us to develop better control over our moods.

Remembering that, for good health and longevity, at no time do we want more than about one teaspoon of sugar (glucose that is) circulating in our blood stream, we know that foods that spike our blood sugar cannot be good for us. We do need to eat something though, as simply cutting out carbs tends to make us miserable.

For my friend in South Wales, who is resolving to drastically cut back on sugar consumption from 1st January (influenced in part by the article below) – I recommend finding out about healthy fats… What is a healthy fat? How do we get a wide range of different healthy fats?

The long article below explains a lot about how fat was vilified while the dangers of sugar mostly ignored. How much of this false information came from the work of Ancel Keys who seems to have falsified evidence to show fat and cholesterol were problematic while being paid for this by the sugar industry?https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/07/the-sugar-conspiracy-robert-lustig-john-yudkin?

Not just bipolar – staying healthy by avoiding ‘ultra-processed foods’ #ADHD

Ultra-processed foods – I am thinking “ultra-processed” may be a useful term, as avoiding all processed foods is too difficult for most people.

e.g. Boiling organic potatoes at home and mashing these with organic butter is food processing…. But compared with… say, making the same potatoes into crisps with about 6 ingredients and cooking such as the water content gets so low the crisps can be stored for a year is surely a lot more processing

This morning I am thinking that, “As most people want to eat processed foods, health may be improved quite a bit just by avoiding the most processed (ultra-processed) foods and going for some really simple processing… e.g. oats cooked in a saucepan with only water and natural rock salt added. This would seem to be fairly low processing.

Article on ultra-processed foods: https://thehealthsciencesacademy.org/science-catch-up/science-catch-up-25/#topic5

((( based on this – after a quick look at where this information came from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27733404 I am thinking that any result other than the people who eat the most biscuits getting fattest would have been odd! )))

I am adding #ADHD to the title above because one of the best things to do for reducing ADHD and bipolar symptoms is to avoid foods with a lot of added chemicals.

Another reason why eating green leafy vegetables helps us to be healthier and happier #CoQ10

I have shared this 6 minute video before. I want to share it again because the second half is amazing.

As Dr Gregor says, “It blew my mind.”

It really is amazing. The main message is scientists have recently discovered a way in which eating green leaves and then going out in the sunshine is incredibly good for us.

Why have so few people watched this? I suggest you skip the first part about faeces in slaughter houses and start watching/listening from 2 minutes 0 seconds.

An Optimum Diet for Mood Stability and Long-Term Good Health #notjustbipolar

Real Food: The Best Diet – Andrew Weil, M.D. explains what to eat and drink more and less of:

(This talk is largely about USA diet. USA has the highest incidence of bipolar and many other modern disorders. Elsewhere in the world we need to learn from America’s mistakes.)

 

Can there really be an optimum diet?

It perhaps depends on what we mean by optimum (or maybe it is optimal?). If optimum diet means the best diet we can work out for ourselves, and a diet we can stick with, to keep us healthy then, yes, it just takes a while to figure out what is good for us.

Why did I start searching for my optimum diet?

Stress caused indigestion, such that I could not sleep and this led to a psychiatric admission where I was heavily sedated, and started to rapidly gain weight. I reacted badly to some of the newer sedative drugs and was diagnosed as bipolar. Eventually coming off the drugs I then had gut pains almost every night. I had to work out what was causing these pains. It took me years to find most of what works and does not work for me. Even with my current optimum diet my quest continues as there is always room for improvement.

It is all about balance

What has worked for me is finding out more about our daily needs for moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and fibre.  That makes five ‘macro-nutrients’ to be balanced. There are plenty of micro-nutrients#1 to be considered too, just that I have found that getting the five macro-nutrients in about the right proportions at each meal time to be life changing.

Modern myths were the biggest challenge to overcome

  • I was once told, “eating fat makes us fat”. It sounded so believable. It is so untrue. What I was eating that was putting weight on was a lot of carbohydrate, and the same was true for every person I knew who was getting fatter. We were all addicted to carbs and we were cutting back on fat. It wasn’t working.
  • I came to believe that “eating lots of protein is a good way to get slimmer”. This is half-true. Protein is more slowly digested than carbohydrate and usually makes us feel fuller for longer. Changing to a high protein/low carb diet is slimming. However, it is rarely a good long-term plan, as high protein diets are often not high enough in fat. On high protein I lost 40 pounds in weight but gradually felt weaker and was not sleeping well. See point 7 that I have just added below – 25th August 2016.
  • I was told that “fibre does not provide any energy and so is slimming”. Yes, fibre can help with slimming, however gut bacteria can partially digest some fibre for us, giving us extra energy. This turns out to be a good thing for moods as this energy is released gradually and helps our guts to work better.
  • I believed, “fruit is slimming”. If you look around (in UK) you may well notice that most over-weight people are eating lots of fruit and very little of green vegetables. Fruit is high in the fruit sugar, fructose. Unlike glucose (the main ‘vegetable sugar’), fructose is not used as energy by the muscles but can be readily turned into body fat by the liver. Fruit may be good, just rarely as good as salad and vegetables.

Balance

When we get past the myths we come back to looking for balance. Here is some good information#2 that works for me:

1)      Proper meals need to have a good percentage of both protein and fat as once digested these can travel through the blood together as lipoproteins, to allow the right fats to be delivered to the right parts of the body and brain to allow repairs. This seems to help a lot with steadying mood.

2)      Most of us are not getting enough good quality fat and are often short of fats known as omega-3 and MCFAs.

3)      It is close to impossible to have fried foods not containing damaged fats, so my current optimum diet is one with no fried foods.

4)      The brain needs glucose, so although we can live with almost no carbohydrates, this is likely to lead to misery. I can get enough glucose by digesting vegetables without needing to eat grain/cereal every day.

5)      There are many types of fibre, so eating a range of vegetables and just a little fruit every day helps with steadier digestion, which in turns helps us to have more of the moods we want to be having.

6)      There can be no set amount of water to go with our diet. Learning to be guided by thirst and drinking as soon as I start to get thirsty works for me. Carrying a bottle of water on all but the most local journeys makes a lot of sense.

7)      It is 2 years since I published this article (16th July 2014) and reading it through today (25th August 2016) the only thing I want to add is: It is so easy to eat too much protein. If you have always eaten meat and fish it takes a while to get used to eating a little less protein. I believe it does help for long-term health and mood stability. For me, a diet with only about 15% protein and close to 50% healthy fats (including; avocado, nuts, seeds, olives and butter) seems to be helping my liver and kidneys to heal after all those years on prescription drugs and lithium.  

From disorder to order

Eliminating the disorder part of bipolar is likely to require dietary changes. For me the most outstanding results have come from increasing#3 my variety of fat sources and ensuring every meal has a good content of healthy fats. It was the extra fats working with the protein in each meal that allowed my brain and body to heal and allows me to go longer between meals. Balanced meals help us to avoid slumps in energy and periods of despondency.  This approach continues to work for me.

Links:

#1 I will be writing more about micro-nutrients and how these link to common modern disorders.

#2 I have written about or am writing about these aspect of balancing diet and mood. Contact me if you would like to learn more now.

#3 Overall I am only eating a bit more fat as I cut out fried foods. Eating more fat and being more active go together. If we eat more fat then we are going to need to walk more. When I do eat more fat I find it easier to be doing more exercise while being less tired. I will write more about this later.

Roger Smith – www.rethinkingbipolar.com – article 14th July 2014

Nutrition and Cancer – Dr Gary Fettke #Fettke

Nutrition and Cancer – what has this got to do with bipolar?

Nutrition and Cancer 2016-06-11

Once anyone has one diagnosis they seem to be prone to a whole lot more.

bipolar diagnosis overlaps other diagnoses

There has to be a connection.

I have worked with people with bipolar disorder for 16 years and have noticed a worrying trend. Not only are my friends with bipolar being diagnosed with diabetes and all the usually chronic conditions that go with taking multiple psychiatric drugs for decades, but now they are coming down with cancer too.

The difference between those who are getting better (by this I simply mean, managing on minimum medication and not getting any fresh diagnoses) and those who are getting sicker and dying young is what we are eating and drinking.

The name of a disorder hardly matters when it comes to prevention, management or potential cures.  We have to make better food and drink choices in order to minimise our need for modern medicine. Dr Gary Fettke is talking sense, so please click on the image to hear him speak and to see the slides, in which he condenses many of the key points about avoiding cancer (running time = 23 minutes),

These key points apply whatever illness we want to avoid and that includes avoiding being labelled as having bipolar disorder.

I am going to add a link here to a longer video of Dr Gary Fettke called, ‘Fructose and Fat – Fact or Fashion’ – Part 1 – The Problem

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVlPcl1pCj0#t=272.9878809

(A lot of experts are not agreeing with Dr Fettke about how much fruit is too much but most of what he is saying, such as, most people needing more vegetables and less processed food, is accepted by every nutritionist.)

 

How best to avoid heart attack – Interview with Dr. Aseem Malhotra on mercola.com

This British cardiologist, Dr. Aseem Malhotra, really knows his stuff.

If you are short of time just listen to the second half of this 19m 20s minute interview – from 9m 30s onward.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/06/05/saturated-fat-heart-disease-risk.aspx

Clearly this is not just for those diagnosed as bipolar. There again, if you are on any kind of prescribed drug listen near the end as the doctor talks about how he defines unacceptable side-effects.

Food and Mood – No wonder USA has had bigger health troubles than UK!

On Mercola.com today…

“FDA to Redefine ‘Healthy’ Foods

  • According to FDA rules, food can only be marketed as healthy if it meets certain nutritional criteria. Snack foods cannot contain more than 3 grams of total fat per serving, and only 1 gram of that can be saturated fat
  • FDA rules do not take sugar into account, which means Pop-Tarts and Frosted Flakes qualify as “healthy,” but salmon and raw nuts do not because of their fat content
  • The FDA has announced it will reevaluate the definition of the word “healthy.” It will also seek to define the word “natural,” and reevaluate regulations for nutrient content claims in general”

What has this to do with bipolar? To resolve any mood disorder you need to be eating plenty of healthy fat. Things like avocados – yet in USA this was defined as unhealthy – not surprising that a lot of Americans have been confused or that they have by far the highest rates of bipolar and many other disorders.

Eating the right things was key for my recovery and still is.

Lithium, Magnesium and Overcoming Fatigue

Lithium, Magnesium and Overcoming Fatigue

In the video below Dr Rhonda Patrick says that we all need to be able to re-absorb magnesium from our urine to avoid magnesium deficiency. (Listen from 2m 00s).

When taking lithium tablets “…dehydration is due to lithium inhibition of the action of antidiuretic hormone, which normally enables the kidney to reabsorb water from urine. This causes an inability to concentrate urine, leading to consequent loss of body water and thirst.from Wiki

With lithium disrupting the hormone, that allows our kidneys to reabsorb water, does this also decrease our ability to re-absorb Magnesium?

Looking at what I can find on this subject it does not seem clear cut (see this medical textbook), but just supposing excess lithium can make a magnesium deficiency worse. With less magnesium we will have less energy levels (and tend to feel older), while bursts of energy, that could be seen as mania will be less frequent. Unfortunately, low magnesium is associated with more rapid aging, more illnesses and earlier death, so this may just be another reason to only take as much lithium as needed and no more.

As I have said again and again, it is so very important not to suddenly stop taking lithium. Talk with experts. If you are going to reduce your use of lithium you need to do this very gradually. Well designed withdrawal programs with many small downward steps over many years tend to work well. I came off lithium over a period of several years and have now been free of all prescribed drugs for more than 4 years. It is not easy to go ‘med-free’. With the right help I believe most people can do it.

In the meantime, as the doctor in the video says, you may wish to get your magnesium level checked. Possibly the only Magnesium test worth having is for the Magnesium that is inside your red blood cells. The test I have had in the past for the Magnesium between the blood cells (in the plasma) does not provide any useful information.

 

Getting this test privately in the UK is likely to cost you £34: http://drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Magnesium_test_-_red_cell

I am going to ask my GP about getting this test paid for by the NHS because so many people lack magnesium and this has been a known driver for mood disorders for decades.

You can watch and learn more about the importance of Magnesium in this short video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWBCnVMoFZA

I do not have much free-time but if you are serious about getting rid of disorder from your life and going on to help others then please feel free to contact me.

 

If you know more about things like:

Mechanism of Li inhibition of vasopressin-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cultured renal epithelial cells.“:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2461098

please add a comment such that I can improve this blogpost

 

Lithium Orotate – response to two readers on similar paths

I think lithium may be a side-issue and providing we are not taking toxic levels then maybe it has no more effect on mood than copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium, calcium etc.

Well, probably far less effect mg for mg, as all the ones I  mention above are essential nutrients and their effects-according-to-intake are well studied and well understood.

E.g. Low zinc with high copper can make psychosis far more likely/far more disturbing, while low magnesium has long been associated with depression and is recognized as one of the top causes of depression for those eating ‘S.A.D.’ foods.

Yes, lithium is a very unusual element, but outside of bipolar and a little off-label prescribing no one is really using it or talking about it. It was banned decades ago for use for physical health because it was greatly increasing heart attack risks.

I think you both may be better to stick with your plans to come down gradually.

Incidentally, do you remember days when you forgot to take lithium the night before – how did you feel on those days? I think this is important information but do not allow whatever those feelings are to influence your current steady reduction route.

When reducing your reliance on lithium or any psychiatric drug then having a plan that your doctor agrees with is extremely valuable. Stick with it. You are both looking fitter and sounding better than when we first met.

 

Nutrition: more moving = better health #notjustbipolar

I have been thinking about how nutrition and movement fit together. Every part (every cell) of our bodies needs nutrients delivered and waste products taken away. This delivery and removal happens best when we move.

As we move about we are probably not thinking about how our movement is helping to keep our brain in good shape, but all the research is confirming that moving is good for our brains too.

I have cut and pasted the following words from today’s Mercola article:

Your brain is capable of rejuvenating and regenerating itself throughout your life. The study participants did not exercise formally but rather got their activity in via walking, gardening, and simply moving about each day – and those who moved the most had significant brain advantages compared to their more sedentary peers. Those who were the most physically active had better brain oxygenation and better patterns of brain activity, particularly in the hippocampus and in connecting different brain regions together.

http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2015/09/18/exercise-brain-health.aspx

When we move and how we move can be very important, but right now I believe the message needs to be…

Find ways to enjoy moving every bit of you every day. (The more we can enjoy moving the more moving we will do.)

…and…

In general: more moving = better health

….

Roger Smith

Currently working with:

Moore Osteopathy – Nottingham, UK

Mind & Body Consultants – Nottingham, UK

Blavet Gites – Brittany, France

Mood disorders are often due to deficiencies in vitamins and/or minerals

bipolar-vitamin

Getting adequate vitamin D reduces the risk of depressive episodes. This is a brand I have used. There are many other brands to choose from.

Regular readers here will be aware that I am not taking any prescribed drugs. I manage this largely by getting all the nutrients I need to have healthy chemical balances. My diet is pretty good, but my ability to absorb all the nutrients in my food is far from perfect. I use a few carefully selected supplements to correct for the deficiencies I have had in the past and common deficiencies that I want to avoid.

I choose the most natural forms I can and this helps me to avoid the most unnatural products from the pharmaceutical industry. However, it seems ‘big pharma’ continues to want to control and limit supply of the things we use that they have not patented. If this subject interests you then this blog post is well worth reading:
http://www.lynnemctaggart.com/blog/300-its-only-natural–like-in-oranges