Sharing Wellness – Free to attend, Bingham, Notts, UK

sharing-wellness-nottingham-2017

SHARE Wellness

I have been working with lots of people for a long time now to figure out what helps people recovery from all sorts of troubles and to have sustained wellness. We are now keen to start sharing what we’ve learned.

We’ve found that Wellness means different things to different people and some people do not even like the word wellness at all! One quick definition that works for me is, Wellness is about; BEING WELL, DOING WELL and BEING ABLE TO ADAPT TO STAY WELL. Later, I am keen to share how others are seeing/considering wellness.

A tricky thing with a new website/blog is knowing what to start with… maybe I just start with the idea that each page/post needs to be entertaining and educational. Also, knowing that WordPress allows for unlimited changes and improvements, so pages and posts may not be perfect but can be improved in response to your comments.

From: SHAREWellnessBlog.com

Intermittent Fasting to Improve Mood – Not just bipolar

Many psychiatric drugs have a side-effect of increased appetite.

As soon as I agreed to take Olanzapine I found I was getting hungry far more frequently while having less and less interest in exercising. On a combination of lithium and Olanzapine I steadied out at around 45 pounds heavier than my usual weight. I am sure I got off lightly as I know many people who about doubled their weight while taking Olanzapine.

I have said/blogged about how my weight came down as I reduced my lithium intake. Now, I believe the bigger factor was my being able to gradually reduce my intake of Olanzapine and eventually coming off all psychiatric drugs. My weight is now about what it was before starting on these drugs.

What has been bothering me for a while is that bad eating habits that set in while I was on Olanzapine keep coming back. Perhaps those habits have never left me.

I have read and watched lots and lots about the importance of fasting, or at least having several hours between meals and not eating when we should be sleeping. My scientific background allows me to feel I understand why eating less often is so beneficial, yet knowing stuff does not necessary make changing habits any easier.

After another stressful period I recently realized that I was again eating from early morning until late evening with perhaps a total of 12 meals/snacks! Not on any psychiatric drugs I’ve not been putting on weight but am sure all this eating has been doing me harm.

Since 1st January (yes, sounds like a New Year resolution) I have started to take overnight fasting seriously. A friend has reminded me of an info-graphic from Dr Mercola. See below.

My current plans are nowhere near so ambitious at this time. I am currently seeing getting past 9am without eating and not eating after about 7pm as great achievements and I am just starting to get benefits from this in terms of having more energy through eating less. Yes, sounds a bit bizarre, but by eating less often I mostly have more energy and feel better too.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is not a form of starvation but a way for you to time your meals to maximize your body’s ability to burn fat. Embed this info-graphic on your site to serve as a guide for you to create a healthy eating plan, and reap the many benefits of fasting done the right way. Use the embed code to share it on your website or visit our infographic page for the high-res version… Intermittent fasting

Replacing refined carbohydrates with healthy fats to have better control of our own moods

Food and Mood: I’ve been teaching about links between excess sugar and mood troubles for years. Now with a lot of renewed interest in this subject I am going to invite readers to comment on these two big generalizations:

  1. Eating refined carbohydrates leads to higher and more variable levels of sugar in the blood, and this leads to all kinds of chronic health troubles as well as less control over our moods.
  2. Eating appropriate amounts (and a good range) of healthy fats helps to keep sugar in the blood at healthy levels making all kinds of chronic health troubles less likely while allowing us to develop better control over our moods.

Remembering that, for good health and longevity, at no time do we want more than about one teaspoon of sugar (glucose that is) circulating in our blood stream, we know that foods that spike our blood sugar cannot be good for us. We do need to eat something though, as simply cutting out carbs tends to make us miserable.

For my friend in South Wales, who is resolving to drastically cut back on sugar consumption from 1st January (influenced in part by the article below) – I recommend finding out about healthy fats… What is a healthy fat? How do we get a wide range of different healthy fats?

The long article below explains a lot about how fat was vilified while the dangers of sugar mostly ignored. How much of this false information came from the work of Ancel Keys who seems to have falsified evidence to show fat and cholesterol were problematic while being paid for this by the sugar industry?https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/apr/07/the-sugar-conspiracy-robert-lustig-john-yudkin?

Not just bipolar – Testing the Link Between Aluminum and Alzheimer’s #Alzheimers

I heard that aluminium may cause brain troubles many years ago. It may have a little to do with bipolar as it has mainly been linked with Alzheimer’s.

A few weeks back I heard that drinking silicon-rich mineral water might help to flush excess aluminium from our brains.

If you watch this two minute video I think you will agree the possibilities are amazing:
Please let me know if you’d like to hear more about amazing possibilities for recovery.

Not just bipolar – staying healthy by avoiding ‘ultra-processed foods’ #ADHD

Ultra-processed foods – I am thinking “ultra-processed” may be a useful term, as avoiding all processed foods is too difficult for most people.

e.g. Boiling organic potatoes at home and mashing these with organic butter is food processing…. But compared with… say, making the same potatoes into crisps with about 6 ingredients and cooking such as the water content gets so low the crisps can be stored for a year is surely a lot more processing

This morning I am thinking that, “As most people want to eat processed foods, health may be improved quite a bit just by avoiding the most processed (ultra-processed) foods and going for some really simple processing… e.g. oats cooked in a saucepan with only water and natural rock salt added. This would seem to be fairly low processing.

Article on ultra-processed foods: https://thehealthsciencesacademy.org/science-catch-up/science-catch-up-25/#topic5

((( based on this – after a quick look at where this information came from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27733404 I am thinking that any result other than the people who eat the most biscuits getting fattest would have been odd! )))

I am adding #ADHD to the title above because one of the best things to do for reducing ADHD and bipolar symptoms is to avoid foods with a lot of added chemicals.

Another reason why eating green leafy vegetables helps us to be healthier and happier #CoQ10

I have shared this 6 minute video before. I want to share it again because the second half is amazing.

As Dr Gregor says, “It blew my mind.”

It really is amazing. The main message is scientists have recently discovered a way in which eating green leaves and then going out in the sunshine is incredibly good for us.

Why have so few people watched this? I suggest you skip the first part about faeces in slaughter houses and start watching/listening from 2 minutes 0 seconds.

Sharing Wellness – Pay It Forward

About 5 years without needing medication and 17 years since hospitalization, I am spending a lot less time on bipolar and a lot more time with family and working on new business ventures.

I am keen to ‘give back’ locally – kind of ‘pay it forward’… If you live near Nottingham in the UK you will be very welcome to join us at any of these events. The first is this Monday 19th Sept 2016.

SHARE Wellness

Printable pdf of this invitation: sharing-wellness-in-a-well-bingham-invitation

An Optimum Diet for Mood Stability and Long-Term Good Health #notjustbipolar

Real Food: The Best Diet – Andrew Weil, M.D. explains what to eat and drink more and less of:

(This talk is largely about USA diet. USA has the highest incidence of bipolar and many other modern disorders. Elsewhere in the world we need to learn from America’s mistakes.)

 

Can there really be an optimum diet?

It perhaps depends on what we mean by optimum (or maybe it is optimal?). If optimum diet means the best diet we can work out for ourselves, and a diet we can stick with, to keep us healthy then, yes, it just takes a while to figure out what is good for us.

Why did I start searching for my optimum diet?

Stress caused indigestion, such that I could not sleep and this led to a psychiatric admission where I was heavily sedated, and started to rapidly gain weight. I reacted badly to some of the newer sedative drugs and was diagnosed as bipolar. Eventually coming off the drugs I then had gut pains almost every night. I had to work out what was causing these pains. It took me years to find most of what works and does not work for me. Even with my current optimum diet my quest continues as there is always room for improvement.

It is all about balance

What has worked for me is finding out more about our daily needs for moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and fibre.  That makes five ‘macro-nutrients’ to be balanced. There are plenty of micro-nutrients#1 to be considered too, just that I have found that getting the five macro-nutrients in about the right proportions at each meal time to be life changing.

Modern myths were the biggest challenge to overcome

  • I was once told, “eating fat makes us fat”. It sounded so believable. It is so untrue. What I was eating that was putting weight on was a lot of carbohydrate, and the same was true for every person I knew who was getting fatter. We were all addicted to carbs and we were cutting back on fat. It wasn’t working.
  • I came to believe that “eating lots of protein is a good way to get slimmer”. This is half-true. Protein is more slowly digested than carbohydrate and usually makes us feel fuller for longer. Changing to a high protein/low carb diet is slimming. However, it is rarely a good long-term plan, as high protein diets are often not high enough in fat. On high protein I lost 40 pounds in weight but gradually felt weaker and was not sleeping well. See point 7 that I have just added below – 25th August 2016.
  • I was told that “fibre does not provide any energy and so is slimming”. Yes, fibre can help with slimming, however gut bacteria can partially digest some fibre for us, giving us extra energy. This turns out to be a good thing for moods as this energy is released gradually and helps our guts to work better.
  • I believed, “fruit is slimming”. If you look around (in UK) you may well notice that most over-weight people are eating lots of fruit and very little of green vegetables. Fruit is high in the fruit sugar, fructose. Unlike glucose (the main ‘vegetable sugar’), fructose is not used as energy by the muscles but can be readily turned into body fat by the liver. Fruit may be good, just rarely as good as salad and vegetables.

Balance

When we get past the myths we come back to looking for balance. Here is some good information#2 that works for me:

1)      Proper meals need to have a good percentage of both protein and fat as once digested these can travel through the blood together as lipoproteins, to allow the right fats to be delivered to the right parts of the body and brain to allow repairs. This seems to help a lot with steadying mood.

2)      Most of us are not getting enough good quality fat and are often short of fats known as omega-3 and MCFAs.

3)      It is close to impossible to have fried foods not containing damaged fats, so my current optimum diet is one with no fried foods.

4)      The brain needs glucose, so although we can live with almost no carbohydrates, this is likely to lead to misery. I can get enough glucose by digesting vegetables without needing to eat grain/cereal every day.

5)      There are many types of fibre, so eating a range of vegetables and just a little fruit every day helps with steadier digestion, which in turns helps us to have more of the moods we want to be having.

6)      There can be no set amount of water to go with our diet. Learning to be guided by thirst and drinking as soon as I start to get thirsty works for me. Carrying a bottle of water on all but the most local journeys makes a lot of sense.

7)      It is 2 years since I published this article (16th July 2014) and reading it through today (25th August 2016) the only thing I want to add is: It is so easy to eat too much protein. If you have always eaten meat and fish it takes a while to get used to eating a little less protein. I believe it does help for long-term health and mood stability. For me, a diet with only about 15% protein and close to 50% healthy fats (including; avocado, nuts, seeds, olives and butter) seems to be helping my liver and kidneys to heal after all those years on prescription drugs and lithium.  

From disorder to order

Eliminating the disorder part of bipolar is likely to require dietary changes. For me the most outstanding results have come from increasing#3 my variety of fat sources and ensuring every meal has a good content of healthy fats. It was the extra fats working with the protein in each meal that allowed my brain and body to heal and allows me to go longer between meals. Balanced meals help us to avoid slumps in energy and periods of despondency.  This approach continues to work for me.

Links:

#1 I will be writing more about micro-nutrients and how these link to common modern disorders.

#2 I have written about or am writing about these aspect of balancing diet and mood. Contact me if you would like to learn more now.

#3 Overall I am only eating a bit more fat as I cut out fried foods. Eating more fat and being more active go together. If we eat more fat then we are going to need to walk more. When I do eat more fat I find it easier to be doing more exercise while being less tired. I will write more about this later.

Roger Smith – www.rethinkingbipolar.com – article 14th July 2014

Nutrition and Cancer – Dr Gary Fettke #Fettke

Nutrition and Cancer – what has this got to do with bipolar?

Nutrition and Cancer 2016-06-11

Once anyone has one diagnosis they seem to be prone to a whole lot more.

bipolar diagnosis overlaps other diagnoses

There has to be a connection.

I have worked with people with bipolar disorder for 16 years and have noticed a worrying trend. Not only are my friends with bipolar being diagnosed with diabetes and all the usually chronic conditions that go with taking multiple psychiatric drugs for decades, but now they are coming down with cancer too.

The difference between those who are getting better (by this I simply mean, managing on minimum medication and not getting any fresh diagnoses) and those who are getting sicker and dying young is what we are eating and drinking.

The name of a disorder hardly matters when it comes to prevention, management or potential cures.  We have to make better food and drink choices in order to minimise our need for modern medicine. Dr Gary Fettke is talking sense, so please click on the image to hear him speak and to see the slides, in which he condenses many of the key points about avoiding cancer (running time = 23 minutes),

These key points apply whatever illness we want to avoid and that includes avoiding being labelled as having bipolar disorder.

I am going to add a link here to a longer video of Dr Gary Fettke called, ‘Fructose and Fat – Fact or Fashion’ – Part 1 – The Problem

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVlPcl1pCj0#t=272.9878809

(A lot of experts are not agreeing with Dr Fettke about how much fruit is too much but most of what he is saying, such as, most people needing more vegetables and less processed food, is accepted by every nutritionist.)

 

How best to avoid heart attack – Interview with Dr. Aseem Malhotra on mercola.com

This British cardiologist, Dr. Aseem Malhotra, really knows his stuff.

If you are short of time just listen to the second half of this 19m 20s minute interview – from 9m 30s onward.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/06/05/saturated-fat-heart-disease-risk.aspx

Clearly this is not just for those diagnosed as bipolar. There again, if you are on any kind of prescribed drug listen near the end as the doctor talks about how he defines unacceptable side-effects.

Food and Mood – No wonder USA has had bigger health troubles than UK!

On Mercola.com today…

“FDA to Redefine ‘Healthy’ Foods

  • According to FDA rules, food can only be marketed as healthy if it meets certain nutritional criteria. Snack foods cannot contain more than 3 grams of total fat per serving, and only 1 gram of that can be saturated fat
  • FDA rules do not take sugar into account, which means Pop-Tarts and Frosted Flakes qualify as “healthy,” but salmon and raw nuts do not because of their fat content
  • The FDA has announced it will reevaluate the definition of the word “healthy.” It will also seek to define the word “natural,” and reevaluate regulations for nutrient content claims in general”

What has this to do with bipolar? To resolve any mood disorder you need to be eating plenty of healthy fat. Things like avocados – yet in USA this was defined as unhealthy – not surprising that a lot of Americans have been confused or that they have by far the highest rates of bipolar and many other disorders.

Eating the right things was key for my recovery and still is.

#Glyphosate facts: It affects mood. It causes cancer.

Having just written about glyphosate – the debate as to whether this carcinogen (currently sprayed on wheat in the UK)  should be banned across the whole of Europe seems to be heating up.

If you agree we need to eliminate this mood altering carcinogenic chemical from our foods then please sign this petition:

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/netherlands-vote-to-keep-glyphosate-out-of-europe

Has glyphosate become the number one cause of mood disorders #glyphosate

Has glyphosate become the number one cause of mood disorders? Okay, so I do not have a huge amount of evidence to support such an idea, but as a chemist I do understand that glyphosate disrupts hormones that are essential for having a steady appropriate mood. It disrupts things like serotonin, dopamine, melatonin and more.

Personally, eating foods that have likely been sprayed with glyphosate, such as non-organic wheat and oats or any kind of bean imported from USA gives me pains in the gut and messes up my sleep. Glyphosate certainly cannot be good for moods and the more that is sprayed the more people are being diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. Are the two connected? I cannot prove any such link but while you are on this page please read on, watch the parts of the video that I mention and please go on to do your own research. Glyphosate is making a lot of people sick.

Glyphosate could be one of the biggest threats to human and animal health the world faces today.

I could write a lot about this, but for the moment here is Dr. Joseph Mercola interviewing Dr. Anthony Samsel, about glyphosate and its adverse health effects.

You may wish to skip chunks and focus on these sections:

At 7 minutes when Dr Samsel explains how he discovered he was consuming a lot of toxic glyphoste in the snack foods he was eating.

At 16minutes Dr Samsel explains more about glyphosate killing ‘good’ gut bacteria but failing kill many of the ‘bad’ bacteria.

At 22 minutes Dr Mercola asks how glyphosate disrupts the production of serotonin and then Dr Samsel explains some of the troubles caused by this disruption.

At 28 minutes details are revealed of how long ago it was known that glyphosate is a carcinogen at the levels found in many common foods.

Glyphosate is sprayed on almost all wheat grown in the UK to kill it before harvesting so that it dries better. This only started a few years ago and is not something that has been explained to the public. We did not used to have so many sick people. As I say above, please do your own research. Would it help if I put more links here to toxins that disrupt moods and cause chronic illnesses?

(I am watching this film about glyphosate in Europe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDyI10Z8aH0 – The film is not at all pleasant, as it includes film of animals said to have been deformed due to ingestion of glyphosate.)

Bipolar Driving Analogy #Wootton

Yesterday, in ‘Psychology Today’, my good friend, Tom Wootton posted a useful short article called, “Bipolar Treatment Is More Than Just Tools To Lower Intensity

Here are a few words from it; “I see too many people who have never learned yet convince themselves that they know how to drive. When their mania gets stronger than they can handle they don’t even have the good sense to put on the brakes. And then, when someone else puts on the brakes for them, they go back to imagining that they know how to drive. Their repeated failure to actually learn the necessary steps is just reinforcing the false notion among everyone around them that it cannot be done.

In the work I have been doing I have found car and driving analogies to be really useful. It fits with the picture millions of people have of recovery, or even everything about life being a journey.

Most people reading this will have passed a driving test after many hours of instruction from a tutor with a great deal of experience. How many of us have done such intensive training for managing our moods and our long-term well-being?